August12014
3AM

(Source: WOLVERXNE, via brain-food)

3AM
utcjonesobservatory:

Dark Dust
This wide field image shows extensive dust and small clumps of star formation in part of the Taurus star formation region. A faint star at the centre of this picture is the young binary star system HK Tauri. ALMA observations of this system have provided the clearest picture ever of protoplanetary discs in a double star. The new result demonstrates one possible way to explain why so many exoplanets — unlike the planets in the Solar System — came to have strange, eccentric or inclined orbits. This picture was created from images from the Digitized Sky Survey 2

utcjonesobservatory:

Dark Dust

This wide field image shows extensive dust and small clumps of star formation in part of the Taurus star formation region. A faint star at the centre of this picture is the young binary star system HK Tauri. ALMA observations of this system have provided the clearest picture ever of protoplanetary discs in a double star. The new result demonstrates one possible way to explain why so many exoplanets — unlike the planets in the Solar System — came to have strange, eccentric or inclined orbits. This picture was created from images from the Digitized Sky Survey 2

(via the-actual-universe)

July292014
huckberryco:

Biking in Iceland. Photo by Chris Burkard for Roark Revival. More here.

huckberryco:

Biking in Iceland. Photo by Chris Burkard for Roark Revival. More here.

(via polerstuff)

July282014
July232014
themaninthegreenshirt:

"It took me twenty years study and practice to work up to what I wanted to play in this performance. How can she expect to listen five minutes and understand it?" Miles Davis, when one of the audience complained that she did not understand what he was playing

themaninthegreenshirt:

"It took me twenty years study and practice to work up to what I wanted to play in this performance. How can she expect to listen five minutes and understand it?" Miles Davis, when one of the audience complained that she did not understand what he was playing

(via trixibelle)

4AM

(Source: omnigma, via polerstuff)

4AM
kqedscience:

Beyond Energy, Matter, Time and Space
“Humans might think we can figure out the ultimate mysteries, but there is no reason to believe that we have all the pieces necessary for a theory of everything.”
Learn more about two science books that explore these ideas and recommended by George Johnson at the nytimes.

kqedscience:

Beyond Energy, Matter, Time and Space

Humans might think we can figure out the ultimate mysteries, but there is no reason to believe that we have all the pieces necessary for a theory of everything.”

Learn more about two science books that explore these ideas and recommended by George Johnson at the nytimes.

(via wildcat2030)

July192014

(Source: sari-berry, via slagroom)

July172014

projecthabu:

     Here, we have the Saturn V rocket, housed inside the Apollo/Saturn V Center at Kennedy Space Center near Titusville, Florida, just a few miles from Launch complex 39, where these beasts once roared into the sky.

     When we look at the enormous first stage of the Saturn V rocket, called an S-IC, we think “spaceship”. Truthfully, the Saturn V first stage never actually made it into space. The stage only burned for the first 150 seconds of flight, then dropped away from the rest of the rocket, all while remaining totally inside Earth’s atmosphere. The S-IC stage is merely an aircraft.

     Even more truthfully, the S-IC stage displayed here at the Apollo/Saturn V Center at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, never flew at all. It is a static test article, fired while firmly attached to the ground, to make sure the rocket would actually hold together in flight. Obviously, these tests were successful, (e.g. she didn’t blow up), and she sits on our Apollo museum today. I wrote more about this particular stage in a previous post, (click here to view.)

     The rest of the rocket, the second and third stages, called the S-II and S-IVB stages, did fly into space. The S-II put the manned payload into orbit, and the S-IVB was responsible for initially propelling that payload from earth orbit to the moon, an act called “trans-lunar injection” (TLI).

     The particular rocket in this display, except for the first stage, is called SA-514. 514 was going to launch the cancelled Apollo 18 and 19 moon missions.

     The command/service module (CSM) in the photos is called CSM-119. This particular capsule is unique to the Apollo program, because it has five seats. All the others had three. 119 could launch with a crew of three, and land with five, because it was designed it for a possible Skylab rescue mission. It was later used it as a backup capsule for the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project.

(via itsfullofstars)

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